So Guy Came Too

David falls ill with laryngitis just at the moment during the Easter holidays when he was meant to be leading his sister (Patience) and his friends Richard Lister, Elizabeth Lister and Judy Milburn on a camping holiday where the girls would sleep in a caravan and the boys in a tent, once again in the depths of the Northumberland countryside not far from Bellingham. The four remaining children set out to make the best of the camp until David is well enough to join them.

Publishing history
Burke, 1954, illus Joanna Curzon
Reprinted, Burke Falcon Library, 1959

The Patience series
They Called Her Patience
It Was All Through Patience
So Guy Came Too
The Five Shilling Holiday

Other editions

 

Summary (Jim Mackenzie)

This is the third book in the “Patience” series which extends to four volumes. Certain details mentioned in it interlock with characters, places and events to be found in the “Marjorie” series.

Lorna Hill reveals that her immediate audience (her daughter Vicky and her friends) clamoured for Guy Charlton from the “Marjorie” series to be introduced into the “Patience” stories simply because he was such a dynamic, attractive and controversial character. A brief appearance in “It was all because of Patience” is now followed by a dominant role in this book.

David falls ill with laryngitis just at the moment during the Easter holidays when he was meant to be leading his sister (Patience) and his friends Richard Lister, Elizabeth Lister and Judy Milburn on a camping holiday where the girls would sleep in a caravan and the boys in a tent, once again in the depths of the Northumberland countryside not far from Bellingham. The four remaining children set out to make the best of the camp until David is well enough to join them. Unfortunately they aren’t very competent without their normal leader and it is only when Guy Charlton arrives that things begin to run smoothly. His well-meaning and well-directed efforts to keep them comfortable and arrange fun things to do are resented by Elizabeth, usually the most polite and well-behaved member of the group. Judy also begins to find that she doesn’t much like being ordered about even though she recognises that what Guy says is always rational and kind. Certain events cause friction – Judy quarrels with Guy over swimming in the tarn by the peel tower (like Peter in “Border Peel”) and then later over going to a dance with Ralph Fenwick. Elizabeth works herself into a passion over a stray dog and how it should be treated and gets herself into a dangerous position near Hordon Castle. Amongst other episodes the children visit a tawdry country fair in Bellingham and make friends with Judith Fenwick at Thankless (see again “Border Peel”).  By the end of the book Guy has become as accepted as an even better leader than David, who rejoins the group for an extra week’s holiday.

Jim Mackenzie 25.1.2005.

 

 

 

Lorna Hill